F. Hodge O'Neal Corporate and Securities Law Symposium

Foreword-Markets and Information Gathering in an Electronic Age: Securities Regulation in the 21st Century

F. Hodge O'Neal Corporate and Securities Law Symposium

Toward More Effective Risk Disclosure for Technology-Enhanced Investing

I will turn first to consider the promise of technology-enhanced investing and the concerns that might heighten. Then, I propose a significant modification of the mandatory disclosure obligation as it relates to investment risk.
F. Hodge O'Neal Corporate and Securities Law Symposium

Securities Regulation in an Electronic Age: The Impact of Cognitive Psychology

Robert B. Thompson
I think the case can be made that we are moving to a different and richer understanding of what should motivate securities regulation, a change that parallels the emergence of the influence of economics on securities regulation over the last twenty years.
F. Hodge O'Neal Corporate and Securities Law Symposium

Technology, Transactions Costs, and Investor Welfare: Is a Motley Fool Born Every Minute?

Lynn A. Stout
Computer network technology promises to revolutionize the secondary securities market and particularly to reduce dramatically the marginal costs associated with trading corporate equities. Lowering transactions costs usually is presumed to increase trader welfare. Certain unique characteristics of the secondary securities market suggest, however, that reducing the marginal costs associated with trading stocks may have the perverse and counterintuitive effect of decreasing investor welfare. Policymakers should consider this possibility as they…
F. Hodge O'Neal Corporate and Securities Law Symposium

Technology, Property Rights in Information, and Securities Regulation

Paul G. Mahoney
This Article will make three observations about the impact of technology on securities markets and securities regulation. First, the cost of transmitting, storing and manipulating data is a very minor component of the social cost of mandatory corporate disclosure; therefore, the welfare effects of mandatory disclosure are not very sensitive to advances in IT. Second, the traditional intermediaries of securities markets, such as brokers, dealers, and exchanges, serve a variety…
F. Hodge O'Neal Corporate and Securities Law Symposium

What Causes New Securities Regulation? 300 Years of Evidence

Stuart Banner
What causes new securities regulation? In a nutshell, crashes.
F. Hodge O'Neal Corporate and Securities Law Symposium

The Fundamentals of an Electronic-Based Federal Securities Act

James D. Cox
This Article examines what the structure of an electronic-based securities act would be if technological conditions that prevail today existed as well in 1933.
F. Hodge O'Neal Corporate and Securities Law Symposium

Götterdämmerung for the Securities Act?

Joel Seligman
A question suggested by a conference like this is whether the Securities Act of 1933 as a whole has reached a point of twilight or whether the inevitable proclivities of some issuers of securities to engage in fraud portends a greater longevity.
F. Hodge O'Neal Corporate and Securities Law Symposium

Rethinking Disclosure Liability in the Modern Era

Merritt B. Fox
Note

Come Hell or High Water: A Water Regime for the Jordan River Basin

Karen A. Baim