Symposium

A Study of “The Common Law Tradition: Deciding Appeals”

Arno C. Becht
The chief object of this review is to give an accurate idea of the contents of Professor Llewellyn’s book, The Common Law Tradition: Deciding Appeals, thus supplying a general background for the other articles. The perfect review, for this purpose, would eliminate all personal reactions of the reviewer, but there are reasons why this ideal is impossible. The mere processes of selection and emphasis require some exercise of discretion, and,…
Symposium

Comment

Harvey M. Johnsen
Symposium

Comment

Laurance M. Hyde
Symposium

The Pursuit of Reckonability

Horace S. Haseltine
Symposium

Dissent from Llewellyn on Dissent

Irving Dilliard
Symposium

Llewellyn’s Lea*-Ways

Julius Cohen
In the Oxford Universal Dictionary 1118 (3d ed. 1955), the word “lea” is defined as “Land that has remained untilled for some time; arable land under grass; land ‘laid down’ for pasture, grass-land.” Deliciously tempting, but quickly withdrawn from application here, is an alternative definition: “A measure of yarn of varying quantity.”